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10th December 2018

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Auckland

Ports of Auckland to build hydrogen production and refuelling facility

In a first for Auckland, Ports of Auckland has committed to build a hydrogen production and refuelling facility at its Waitemata port. The company, and project partners Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and KiwiRail, will invest in hydrogen fuel cell vehicles including port equipment, buses and cars as part of the project.

Ports of Auckland Chief Executive Tony Gibson said “We have an ambitious target to be a zero emission port by 2040. In order to meet that target we need a new renewable and resilient power source for heavy equipment like tugs and straddle carriers, which are difficult to power with batteries. Hydrogen could be the solution for us as it can be produced and stored on site, allows rapid refuelling, and provides greater range than batteries.”

Ports of Auckland will fund the construction of a facility which will produce hydrogen from tap water. The process uses electrolysis to split water into hydrogen (which is then stored for later use) and oxygen, which is released into the air. Demonstration vehicles will be able to fill up with hydrogen at the facility, which will be just like filling up a car with CNG or LPG. Hydrogen is used in the fuel cell to create electricity which powers the car. The only by-product of the process is water.

“If this trial is successful”, said Mr Gibson, “the technology would have a very wide application. It could help Auckland and New Zealand towards energy self-sufficiency and our emission reduction goals. Trucks, trains and ferries could also run on hydrogen – something which is already being done overseas – which would be a significant benefit for the community. Hydrogen powered vehicles are quieter and emit nothing more than clean water.”

The project partners will provide technical support and will purchase hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for the project. Global hydrogen experts Arup are also helping support this project through the development, design and delivery phases.

Mayor Phil Goff said, “I welcome this trial. It is a first for New Zealand and shows Auckland’s desire to lead on climate change action and meet our ambitious emissions reduction targets.

“With 40 per cent of emissions in Auckland coming from our transport system, alternative energy sources to power vehicles, such as electric and hydrogen, are critical to meeting the target of global warming to 1.5 degrees.

“With infrastructure in place, hydrogen has the potential to power our buses and other parts of our vehicle fleet both reducing global emissions and cutting back on air pollution in Auckland such as in Queen Street where carbon levels are very high,” says Mayor Phil Goff.

Auckland Council’s Chief Executive, Stephen Town, says, “We’re proud to collaborate with the Ports of Auckland, Auckland Transport and KiwiRail on this innovative hydrogen project – a first for New Zealand. It is important for organisations like ours, as signatories to the Climate Leaders Coalition, to continue leading on climate change action; it’s also important for us to push the boundaries with ambitious projects that demonstrate leadership here in Auckland. Trialling new technology to reduce emissions and signalling a smarter economic future is important for our city’s people, places and prosperity.”

KiwiRail Acting CEO Todd Moyle says KiwiRail is delighted to be part of this ground-breaking project. “KiwiRail is committed to a sustainable future and has set a goal to be carbon neutral by 2050. While rail is an inherently sustainable form of transport with 66% fewer carbon emissions than heavy road freight, new fuel sources like hydrogen have enormous potential for the future of transport in New Zealand.

“Just weeks ago, two hydrogen-powered trains with a range of 1000km per tank began operating commercial services in Germany. If successful with passengers, there is no reason why the next development could not be hydrogen-powered freight trains.

“Joining forces with Ports of Auckland in this project will allow us to explore how KiwiRail could use this new technology as we deliver stronger connections for New Zealand.”

Auckland Transport Chief Executive Shane Ellison says AT is committed to clean technology and is very interested in the possibilities of hydrogen power. “This could be part of the answer for our fleet of buses and harbour ferries. The idea of a vehicle which only produces water as a by-product is very exciting.”

The project is currently in the planning phase, and Ports of Auckland is about to start stakeholder engagement before applying for resource consent in early 2019. The facility is planned to be operational by the end of 2019.

An aerial view of Ports of Auckland from the west.
SUPPLIED
An aerial view of Ports of Auckland from the west.

A rift has opened up between Auckland Council and the Government over how the future of the city’s port will be decided.

Mayor Phil Goff says there’s a risk that a Government-appointed working group looking at the upper North Island ports might have pre-determined whether Auckland’s council-owned port could move, and if so where.

Goff said he put a “robust” view to the working group’s chair, former Far North mayor Wayne Brown, in a private meeting last week.

A council commissioned study found shifting the vehicle import trade, could lose Auckland $1 billion
BEVAN READ/STUFF
A council commissioned study found shifting the vehicle import trade, could lose Auckland $1 billion

He said Brown’s public rejection of two potential locations identified by a council study didn’t give confidence, and the group didn’t appear to have enough time or resources to do a proper job.

The council on Tuesday approved a blunt letter to be sent to Brown, ahead of the council’s first formal meeting with the working group in just over a fortnight.

Goff favoured the eventual shift of the port from its current location on the downtown waterfront, but was unhappy with the approach being taken by the working group.

The council will tell the group that its priorities include protecting the value of Ports of Auckland, which last year paid it a $51.1 million dividend.

It is also telling the working group it wants a transparent, objective and evidence-based approach to reviewing the future of the ports in Auckland, Tauranga and Whangarei.

Auckland Council has conducted the most detailed work so far on the future of its port.

Previous mayor Len Brown funded out of his office budget the Port Future Study, which in 2016 found the port might not outgrow its current site in 50 years, but that work should begin on identifying alternatives, in case it did.

Before the 2017 elections New Zealand First advocated an early shift of the vehicle-import trade from Auckland to Northland’s port.

The coalition government including New Zealand First took a bigger picture approach, setting up the Upper North Island Supply Chain Strategy working group, in line with a request from Auckland Council.

New Zealand First MP and Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones who oversees the working group, has since been vocal on matters relating to the future of Auckland’s port.

At the start of November Jones said he would do all he could to head-off a planned multi-storey carpark building planned by Ports of Auckland, to house vehicles arriving in the port.

“Public statements have created the impression of pre-determination,” said the council in a letter to the chair of the working group Wayne Brown.

Brown has made public comment favouring a move to Northland, including an opinion column published in November 2017 before being appointed to chair the group.

“Imagine the Auckland waterfront without used cars getting the best views,” Brown wrote.

“Watch for self-justifying job-saving promises from Ports of Auckland to fend off any sensible moves like Sydney has made keeping the harbour just for cruise liners and sending cargo to Wollongong and Newcastle.”

The council’s letter pointed to comments by Brown.

“Indicating a strong preference for relocation of some or all of POAL activities to Northport prior to any analysis is unhelpful,” said the letter which Goff will sign.

“Any plans to move all or some of the Port’s functions requires the concurrence of its owners, the people of Auckland, through Auckland Council,” said the letter.

“I’ve already said to the chair, we’ve put a lot of work into two future options (Manukau Harbour and Firth of Thames) and you’ve dismissed this out of hand, which gives us no confidence,” Goff told today’s planning committee meeting.

The council has spelled out 10 areas it wants the working group to examine closely.

These include the feasible capacity of all upper North Island ports, as well as the climate change impacts of moving freight to and from the ports.

It wanted work done on the social and community impacts of any change, and how and when a future new port would be funded.

The council will have its first meeting with the government’s working group on December 13.

 

Automation and capacity update from Ports of Auckland

22 November 2018

Operational Update

Automation and Capacity Project – Update

Our project to transform Fergusson Terminal which will provide future capacity is well underway and visitors to the port will have seen a lot of activity and changes including civil works, construction workers and sections of tarmac undergoing renewal.  What has been happening recently:

A-Strads

Visitors will have seen the new blue “A Strads” now assembled on the north end of the terminal, undergoing a comprehensive range of testing in readiness for Go-Live next year.

 

 

 

 

Road Exchange

The work to upgrade the truck lanes has been completed and the next stage is installing the gates and fences required to keep truck drivers and A Strads separated.

Pre-gate Kiosk Screens

These have been updated. Drivers now need to complete some additional steps at the kiosk.  This means that when automation goes live, the drivers will already be familiar with the new system.

Reefer Gantries

The large shiny frames of the new reefer gantries at the southern end of the Fergusson terminal are now complete and sign-off for the reefer operation is expected before the end of this year.  In the meantime, we have been able to use the area as valuable stacking space for dry containers.

New Container Cranes

There was a lot of media interest and celebration with the arrival of our three new container cranes on the specialised delivery vessel Zhen Hua 25.

It was a great sight to see them sail into the harbour in the early morning. These cranes, which have quad-lift capacity (they can lift four containers at once), are now in place on Fergusson North Berth and will be commissioned early 2019, after a range of testing required to integrate them into our current systems.

 

Hatch Platforms have now been installed on all container cranes – these allow the ship’s hatch covers to be stored above the ground, freeing up space around the cranes for container handling.

Lash Platforms In a first for New Zealand, we’re installing lash platforms on all our cranes and our new cranes have them already fitted.  This will make stevedores’ job safer, as they can work above ground away from moving straddles.

Rail OCR (Optical Character Recognition)

A frame, fitted with multiple cameras, has been placed over the rail line to capture images and recognise container numbers arriving and leaving by rail. This system provides a high degree of accuracy and enables rail planners to quickly check on any “exceptions”.

Supply Chain Challenges

There are a range of challenges being experienced throughout the supply chain. We are automating Fergusson Terminal to increase capacity and productivity, whilst at the same time experiencing unprecedented volume demand. It is a bit like having heart surgery while playing rugby!

While we’re carrying out the automation work our terminal capacity is actually reduced, putting pressure on our operations especially during peak import season.

We are undertaking this transformation to ensure we are ready to accommodate Auckland’s rapid growth in freight demand.  We’ll be able to handle more containers on the same land, but it also means some changes in the way cargo owners and trucking companies interact with the port.

Greater planning and different ways of operating are needed throughout the freight supply chain. The port operates 24/7 and yet the wider supply chain largely works 24/5 at best, and often 9 to 5 Monday to Friday.

Extended operational hours are needed at distribution centres, empty depots and importers’ and exporters’ premises to maximise the capacity of the whole supply chain.  It is much the same as an internet connection – you’re currently on dial-up and want to upgrade to fibre, but you only get the best speed if you’ve got fibre end-to-end.

We have been engaging with importers, exporters, trucking companies and freight forwarders to discuss the changes and welcome you to make contact to discuss any issues you may have.

Further Progress

Our automation go-live date is late 2019.  There are a number of civil, operational, engineering and I.T. projects being undertaken, some of which need to be completed in a specific order and others are more flexible.  This means that we are continually adjusting the timing of work.  We will keep you updated on progress and changes.

Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to discuss any ideas or concerns, at any stage.

For more information contact

Customer Service

P: +64 9 348 5100 Ext. 1

E: customerservice@poal.co.nz

 

For VBS queries contact

Transport Co-ordinators

P: +64 9 348 5100 Ext.2

E: driversassist@poal.co.nz

 

 

Ports of Auckland have joined the Climate Leaders Coalitiona collection of business leaders who have each committed to act on climate change.

Ports of Auckland is the first port in the world to make this commitment and the first port in New Zealand to be CEMARS® certified. Joining the coalition contributes to the ports promise to become zero emissions by 2040.

More information on the Climate Leaders Coalition can be found here. Read the CEO Climate Change Statement here.

 

Auckland’s supply chain complications

Media release – POAL and NRC 14/11/19

Auckland’s supply chain complications

National Road Carriers Association and the Ports of Auckland are combining forces to promote change in the supply chain to improve delivery times and prevent delays.

This initiative has come about because of supply chain capacity issues which were highlighted following an accident at Ports of Auckland in August. Imported freight has taken longer to deliver and exporters have encountered delays getting their goods away, leading to frustration all round.

“The supply chain is running at capacity, so unexpected problems can have a domino effect,” says David Aitken, National Road Carriers CEO.
“At its heart, the problem is Auckland’s growth. The supply chain needs to evolve and we’re all going to have to change the way we work to prevent future problems. Better planning and coordination are the key.”

“We’re letting stakeholders know what causes hold-ups and we’re working with partners to improve our end-to-end processes,” he added.
Situations contributing to delays can arise at any stage in the supply chain, sometimes occurring thousands of kilometres away from New Zealand.
“In the last 12 months over half of all container ships arrived at Auckland late (often as a result of bad weather), causing congestion,” says Craig Sain, Ports of Auckland’s General Manager Commercial Relationships. “This makes it hard for us to staff the terminal properly, causing delays.”

Labour scheduling issues at the port are made worse by a shortage of labour in Auckland, which also affects the trucking industry.

The port is currently installing an automated container handling system to address this problem, but the work required to install the system has reduced terminal capacity by about 20%, adding to congestion. This situation will remain until late 2019 when the project will be completed.
“With reduced space in the terminal and more containers coming in due to growing Auckland demand for freight, it is taking us longer to service trucks visiting the port,” says Mr Sain.

Another problem is that getting containers off the port can be delayed because there is nowhere for the containers to go. The port works 24/7 and has capacity at nights and weekends, but often distribution centres, importers warehouses and empty container depots are closed at these times.
“In the past working 9-5, Monday to Friday was fine, but now Auckland has over 1.5 million people it is no longer feasible,” says Mr Sain. “The whole industry needs to be able to work 24/7, not just the port and carriers, and this means distribution centres and importers need to be open nights and weekends to receive imports.”

The road freight transport industry is caught in the middle says David Aitken.  “Importers don’t want to pay for weekend or afterhours work but they also don’t want to pay to hold containers at the port or container depots as a result of their limited business hours.”

“We are storing containers at freight hubs longer, which adds costs for double handling, or are delivering goods later than originally expected because of holdups. We’re also facing higher costs because of Auckland’s congestion, costs which could be avoided by working 24/7,” he added.

The solution is going to come through a combination of technology, greater co-ordination and a move to 24/7 working throughout the supply chain.
As well as investing in automated container handling, Ports of Auckland is working with National Road Carriers Association to update its processes and business rules to minimise manual intervention and incentivise off-peak container movements. Last minute freight moves will become a thing of the past, with all movements having to be planned in advance.

“As a port we have a key role to play and we are trying to educate other players in the supply chain so that they understand the need for change and what they can do to make the process more efficient,” said Craig Sain. “Ultimately, these changes will benefit New Zealand through the fast, efficient and cost-effective delivery of freight.”

8 November

National MPs from all over the country have lined up at Parliament this morning to submit ‘save the highways’ petitions signed by thousands of their constituents.

National MP Amy Adams announces she will stand for National Party leader.

Selwyn MP Amy Adams said more than 1000 people signed her petition for the State Highway 1 link between Christchurch and Ashburton to go ahead. Photo: RNZ / Rebekah Parsons-King

They are concerned that major roading projects National announced are being canned by this government in favour of more public transport options or “minimal” safety upgrades of existing roads.

Examples include the Auckland east-west link, the Napier to Hastings expressway and the construction of a four-lane state highway one link between Christchurch and Ashburton.

MPs for the electorates north of Auckland hope to save the ‘four-lanes to Whangarei’ project, with Rodney MP Mark Mitchell saying the uncertainty was having a huge impact on people’s well-being.

“The cancellation of these projects not only reduces road safety, do not only take away the economic opportunities they would create, but it’s also creating a lot of stress.

“There’s a human toll to the people who actually live on these designated routes and have a lot of uncertainty created from very poor decisions, I feel, at central government level,” Mr Mitchell said.

An image of the completed East West roading project.

The proposed east-west motorway link in Auckland was scrapped by the government last year. Graphic: Supplied / NZTA

Eight petitions have been delivered, with thousands of signatures from the MPs constituents.

Amy Adams, the MP for Selwyn, said the State Highway 1 link between Christchurch and Ashburton must go ahead.

“The volume of traffic on those roads is making them not only more dangerous, but more and more congested, obviously effecting productivity,” she said.

Ms Adams said she had more than a thousand people sign up in a short time.

Bay of Plenty MP Todd Muller and Coromandel MP Scott Simpson submitted on the Katikati to Tauranga four-lane link, which it announced in 2017 and said Labour must commit to.

They want a grade separated connection from Omokoroa onto State Highway 2 and a Katikati bypass.

Few questions were asked by the government MPs who sit on the transport committee, however National MP Paul Goldsmith asked a number of questions about the impact of the regional fuel tax on the MPs’ communities.

He said there was little thought for people outside of Auckland who would never benefit from the expensive public transport projects the government was funding in the city.

Shippers worried low pollution fuel could carry high price tag

Cleaning up smokey funnels could could land New Zealand shippers with much higher fuel bills as the Government inches towards cutting pollution levels.

The Ministry of Transport will shortly begin public consultation on whether to ratify Annex VI of an international maritime convention (MARPOL) which makes use of lower sulphur level fuel mandatory from 2020.

Shipping line Maersk​ converted to using the cleaner burning fuel in New Zealand waters in 2011, but switched back after its fuel bill soared by $1m during the one year trial, forcing the company to turn down a nomination for a Clean Air Society achievement award.

Maersk makes about 1000 New Zealand port visits a year and its oceania operations manager Stuart Jennings said the more expensive fuel cut sulphur levels in exhaust gases by more than 80 per cent, but the company regrettably suspended the pilot due to lack of support from other local industry stakeholders.

“We believe that a strong enforcement regime is crucial to ensure a level playing field for carriers as well as shippers, and to make sure that health and environmental benefits are continuously maximised.”

Maersk shipping line cut sulphur emissions at the Port of Auckland by 72 tonnes a year after it switched to a cleaner fuel, but the change proved too expensive and was abandoned after other shippers failed to follow suit.
SUPPLIED
Maersk shipping line cut sulphur emissions at the Port of Auckland by 72 tonnes a year after it switched to a cleaner fuel, but the change proved too expensive and was abandoned after other shippers failed to follow suit.

Jennings said that from 2020 all vessels in its global fleet would comply with the Annex VI requirement to reduce maximum sulphur levels from 3.5  per cent to 0.5 per cent, regardless of whether New Zealand had ratified the clause.

Atmospheric scientist Jennifer Barclay​ nominated Maersk for the clean air award and said the company’s switch to cleaner burning diesel reduced the amount of sulphur released into Auckland skies by 72 tonnes a year.

It was disappointing other shippers had not followed suit, but she understood Maersk’s reversal. “It’s not their fault, central government needs to pull finger and do something.”

Ministry of Transport international connections manager Tom Forster said the Resource Management Act allowed for discharges into air for normal ship operations, and New Zealand had not previously signed up to Annex VI “because our weather conditions and comparatively small ship numbers meant maritime air pollution was not seen as a significant issue.”

He said domestic legislation would need to be changed if ratification was agreed on once consultation was completed.

Members of the NZ Shipping Federation, including the InterIslander, are anxious to know where they stand over the supply and cost of low sulphur fuel.
SCOTT HAMMOND/STUFF
Members of the NZ Shipping Federation, including the InterIslander, are anxious to know where they stand over the supply and cost of low sulphur fuel.

NZ Shipping Federation executive director Annabel Young said she expected New Zealand to ratify the clean fuel clause by 2023, but 98 per cent of shipping capacity worldwide had already done so. “We are the outlier.”

Her members, who include the InterIslander, Strait Shipping and Coastal Bulk Shipping, were anxious to know where they stood over the supply and cost of low sulphur fuel.

Diesel was the only fuel in New Zealand that met the specified sulphur content, but cost up to 50 per cent more than what many vessels currently used, and it was unclear whether the Marsden Point refinery would retool to produce low sulphur marine fuel, said Young.

A Refining New Zealand spokesman said they were still investigating options for the refinery to make 0.5% sulphur fuel oil.

“That process will give a good indication of the production costs involved, and quantities we can make on behalf of our oil company customers.”

Young said another complication was that a recent amendment to Annex VI prevented ships entering the ports of more than 80 signatory-countries from carrying dirtier-burning heavy fuels.

That meant New Zealand coastal ships, such as the interisland ferries, would have to switch fuel before entering dry docks in Australia or Singapore, and it cost hundreds of thousands of dollars

“Switching fuels takes months, it’s not something you do lightly …going to dry dock will be a very expensive transition.”

Young said that methanol was a clean fuel option that more shippers were seriously considering, but there were questions about the security of supply once the Crown Minerals Amendment Bill passed.

However, a Methanex New Zealand representative said that would not be an issue. “If the shipping industry used methanol we’d be guaranteeing supply.”

Stuff

Former PM Helen Clark slams proposal for Auckland port carpark

Former Prime Minister Helen Clark has waded into the Ports of Auckland waterfront debate. Photo / Greg Bowker
Former Prime Minister Helen Clark. Photo / Greg Bowker NZ Herald

Former Prime Minister Helen Clark has weighed into another high-profile planning proposal for Auckland, describing a bid for a car park on Bledisloe Wharf as “mind boggling” in its lack of vision.

Clark took to Twitter last night to let her 185,000 followers know of her distaste for a five storey car park scheduled to be erected by the Ports of Auckland (POAL) in 2019.

“What city with a vision for its waterfront would want a car park occupying prime land on it! Whatever one thinks of the stadium proposal, the Ports of #Auckland proposal for constructing a permanent car park on Bledisloe Wharf is mind boggling. #AucklandCanDoBetter @simonbwilson” Clark wrote at 11.14pm yesterday.

Artist impression of a car park building proposed for Bledisloe Wharf on the Auckland Waterfront. Photo / SuppliedArtist impression of a car park building proposed for Bledisloe Wharf on the Auckland Waterfront. Photo / Supplied

The tweet was in response to an article by Herald journalist Simon Wilson that revealed the 17 metre “car-handling” facility was included in POAL’s “30-year masterplan”, and would essentially scrap any possible Auckland harbour-side stadium.

The car-park, which will extend about a fifth the length of Bledisloe Wharf and just over a third of its width, will also have a hotel built between it and Quay St if Auckland Council approves it in the coming months.

The post received 42 retweets and over 200 likes in the 12 hours since it was written, with Clark providing the additional comment that Auckland Council “is disempowered by current legislation. Maybe this is the opportunity to change that!”

It is not the first time in 2018 Clark has had her say on big Auckland issues, after she fought against plans to hold a Waitangi Day appeal concert at Eden Park.

A Mount Eden resident, Clark said in July this year she was relieved the “Million Babies” Waitangi Day LifePod Appeal concert was rejected by the Eden Park Trust.

The former Labour PM had argued the concert would be a “Torjan Horse” to provide a precedent for future music concerts at the suburban Auckland stadium.

Clark’s three-term stint as New Zealand Prime Minister ended in 2008, but she has not shied away from public life since – running an unsuccessful campaign to be the first female UN Secretary General in 2016.

Public transport groups push for rail from Auckland CBD to airport

Public transport groups are renewing calls to run trains from the Auckland CBD to the airport.

A public meeting has been called by the Public Transport Users Association and NZ Transport 2050 to argue that trains, not modern trams, are the best form of rapid transit to the airport.

In recent months, New Zealand Transport Agency chief executive Fergus Gammie has said the best route between the CBD and the airport is by train to Puhinui, and transferring to buses or trams for the final 6km leg to the airport.

The transport agency still intends to build a $3.7 billion line for modern trams, referred to as light rail, from the CBD to the airport but sees the lines as combining transport and development opportunities.

Next Tuesday’s meeting will highlight an alternative transport strategy called Start, “Straight to Airport Rapid Trains”.

NZ Transport 2050 chairman Paul Miller said the Government and Auckland Council have been sold a lemon which won’t solve the massive congestion issues caused by the trending growth at Auckland Airport.

“It seems that officials have been hijacked into something which simply does not solve the congestion problem, wastes the billions we have spent on trains, will cause significant issues for those living on Dominion Rd and won’t remove a single truck from the roads trying to reach the expansive airport logistics and surrounding manufacturing zones,” he said.

Meeting organisers will present information to highlight the disadvantages trams will have to an airport, including how the bus link from the airport to Puhinui station is not a First-World solution.

An artist's impression of light rail running down Dominion Rd to Auckland airport. Image / Auckland TransportAn artist’s impression of light rail running down Dominion Rd to Auckland airport. Image / Auckland Transport

“A modern, fast train linking the airport to every single Auckland railway station and south to Hamilton and Tauranga is what we need the Government to take a serious and objective look at.

“The Minister of Transport, Phil Twyford, needs to be open minded on the airport congestion issues before he commits taxpayers to fund one of the slowest tram/light-rail links in the world to Auckland airport and a “user unfriendly” airport bus shuttle link from Puhinui railway station,” said Miller.

Jon Reeves, national co-ordinator of the Public Transport Users Association said: “If the NZTA are going to fund any large-scale transport project we would like it be a something that benefits the widest reach of Auckland, the Waikato and the Bay of Plenty.

Jon Reeves, from public transport lobby group Campaign For Better Transport, wants trains to run from Britomart to Auckland Airport. Photo / Brett PhibbsJon Reeves, from public transport lobby group Campaign For Better Transport, wants trains to run from Britomart to Auckland Airport. Photo / Brett Phibbs

Auckland has spent over $6.5b on our railway network in the past 16 years, and the city rail link tunnel will further open up reach of our rail system. To not capitalise on that investment by operating fast, modern airport trains is purely crazy, Reeves said.

High-rise sized cranes from China welcomed at Ports of Auckland with a waiata

Auckland’s port has just become home to the largest cranes in Australasia.

Three massive container-lifting cranes, each one larger than central Auckland’s HSBC building, completed the final leg of their month long journey from Shanghai, China, to Auckland on Friday morning.

The special delivery was the culmination of 20 years worth of preparation, and a $60 million investment.

The cranes, which stood 82.3 metres tall and weighed 2100 tonnes each, docked at Ports of Auckland in Mechanics Bay after 9am.

From there they will be offloaded onto the Ferguson North Wharf using specially designed rail tracks.

Three gigantic cranes arrived in the Auckland harbour on Friday morning.

Ports of Auckland boss Tony Gibson said they were the most technically advanced cranes on the market.

“They lift four containers at once and they can lift containers out of the hull of a ship at different heights – which is a first in the world”

He said the cranes’ capacity would greatly increase of the port’s ability to load and unload ships.

The cranes stand 82 metres tall and weigh 2100 tonnes - each one larger than central Auckland's HSBC building.
ALDEN WILLIAMS/STUFF
The cranes stand 82 metres tall and weigh 2100 tonnes – each one larger than central Auckland’s HSBC building.

“They weigh a massive 2100 tonnes each – about 1000 tonnes heavier than our existing cranes.”

The cranes were manufactured by Chinese multinational engineering company ZPMC, especially for Auckland’s port.

They could stack containers on ships 9 high. New Zealand’s current largest cranes can stack containers only 7 high.

The special delivery was the culmination of 20 years worth of preparation, and a $60 million investment.
ALDEN WILLIAMS
The special delivery was the culmination of 20 years worth of preparation, and a $60 million investment.

Auckland mayor Phil Goff said with such precious cargo, it was lucky the ship had not passed through a typhoon.

“This means that we have the most technologically advanced cranes and we can cope with the largest ship coming to our port.”

He said the upgrade was good for Ports of Auckland, and therefore a “bonus” for the ratepayers.

Ports of Auckland workers, standing on the decks of the old cranes, lined up for an unobstructed view of the new Chinese imports.
ALDEN WILLIAMS/STUFF
Ports of Auckland workers, standing on the decks of the old cranes, lined up for an unobstructed view of the new Chinese imports.

“Ports of Auckland is of course owned by Auckland council, so its dividends feed directly into the ratepayers.”

Port’s spokesman Matt Ball said the cranes were needed to keep up with Auckland’s growth.

“More people in the city means more freight. The ships that bring our goods from overseas are getting bigger, so we need to make sure we can handle them.

The new cranes will work at double the capacity of the current ones.
ALDEN WILLIAMS/STUFF
The new cranes will work at double the capacity of the current ones.

“With these new cranes, and the new deep water berth they will sit on, we’ll be able to handle the biggest ships coming to New Zealand.”

CRANES BY NUMBERS

– 82.3m tall, current cranes are 69.2m.

– 2100 tonnes, current cranes are 1300 tonnes.

– Able to lift four containers at once, current cranes can lift two.

– Able to be remotely operated – a New Zealand first.

– Able to lift containers stacked at different heights.

– Can reach 21 containers across, current cranes can reach 19 across.

Stuff

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