Welcome to Cubic Transport Services - for a great freight experience
23rd September 2017

08:00 – 17:00

Monday to Friday

L 14, 151 Queen St

Auckland 1010, NZ

0800 2 CUBIC

Uncategorized

Limited opportunity for lower freight emissions from coastal shipping and rail, says MoT

Coastal shipping and rail have less potential in the drive to reduce carbon emissions. Photo / 123RF

Coastal shipping and rail have less potential in the drive to reduce carbon emissions from the transport sector than the optimistic view expressed in a Productivity Commission issues paper on decarbonising the New Zealand economy, says the Ministry of Transport in a submission to the commission’s inquiry.

“We concur with your assessment that electric vehicles (EVs) are by the far greatest emissions abatement opportunity New Zealand has to lower transport emissions,” says the two-page response to the issues paper sent on September 4 by Joanna Pohau, the ministry’s acting manager, people and environment.

However, the ministry is less optimistic about the potential for coastal shipping and rail to move freight out of road-based trucking, mainly because so much of New Zealand’s freight ‘task’ involves sending goods over short distances and because customers have come to expect ‘just-in-time’ deliveries that ships and trains struggle to fulfil.

“Much of our freight moves over short distances,” the ministry says. “This is a movement that is typically only economic for road freight. As well, some cargo, for example liquid milk, best suits being moved by road” and “not all locations have access to rail and/or coastal shipping.”

The ministry expects that lower emissions from long-haul freight operations will emerge from a combination of some cargoes shifting to shipping and rail, greater collaboration among cargo owners, more fuel efficient trucks, increased use of bio-fuels and, ultimately, “adopting new fuel and vehicle technologies as they arise”.

This could include electric heavy long-haul trucks “if they become available”.

The submission coincides with the announcement of an EV car-sharing scheme in Christchurch that its backers claim is the largest in the Southern hemisphere.

From late November, some 70 of an eventual fleet of 100 EVs will be available for Canterbury businesses and residents through fleet management company Yoogo, which has been selected by Christchurch City Council to implement the services.

The company’s “electric car sharing model breaks down barriers around cost and charging infrastructure, making pure electric vehicles accessible and affordable,” Kirsten Corson, Yoogo general manager, said in a statement.

The service will be available for the CCC, Ara Institute, engineering firms Aurecon and Beca, the Canterbury District Health Board, law firm Chapman Tripp, Environment Canterbury, Meridian Energy, architects Tonkin and Taylor, and Warren and Mahoney, and, Christchurch Airport, as well as for the general public.

In its submission, MoT agrees with the Productivity Commission’s suggestion that “current policy settings may need to be revisited if we are to achieve a widespread uptake of EVs” and endorses setting fuel efficiency standards as one route to achieve that.

Transport Minister Simon Bridges announced late last month that the government was setting a target of one-in-three of the government’s car fleet being EVs by 2021.

Speed limit around Waterview Tunnel restored to 100km/h

12/9/17

The weight of public opinion forces bureaucrats to rethink their speed limit strategy.  The speed limit around Auckland’s Waterview Tunnel is going up to 100km/h again.

The NZ Transport Agency announced late this afternoon that the variable speed limits will be extended on sections of State Highway 16 and 20 around the tunnel.

Since opening in July, the limit has dropped to 80km/h in the area. Authorities have said the drop in the speed limit is in keeping with international best practice.

However, it has proven to be unpopular with many motorists.

NZTA’s transport agency system design manager Brett Gliddon said: “We want to ensure that people’s journeys on the motorway are as safe and easy as we can make them.

“Variable speeds are increasingly being used to match speed limits with the conditions and provide the right balance between safety and keeping traffic flowing smoothly.”

Speed limits inside the tunnel will remain at 80km/h to manage the higher risks associated with an enclosed tunnel environment.

Gliddon said authorities had been monitoring the operational and safety performance on the state highways around the tunnel since it opened.

They had also taken on customer and stakeholder feedback in the past few months.

Earlier this month, thousands of people signed a petition via the Change.Org website calling on transport authorities to increase the speed limit from 80km/h to 100km/h on Auckland’s Northwestern Motorway.

The petition was started by Hamilton man Bradley Scales.

“Why, when you have a brand new four-lane wide motorway, would you make the speed limit 80km/h? To improve safety? That is the most ridiculous explanation I have heard,” he wrote.

Police have yet to reveal the number of speed tickets they have issued since the tunnel opened.

There are speed cameras inside as well as areas around it.

The Big Read: Roads v Rail – political parties at the crossroads on transport

The Big Read: Roads v Rail – political parties at the crossroads on transport – NZ Herald

The wheels are turning in voters’ minds as they consider which party offers the best deal on transport. Photo / Nick Reed

National has returned to a familiar theme with a $10 billion plan to build 10 major highways around the country, while Labour and the Greens have latched onto modern trams in Auckland and long distance trains between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga.

Also in the mix is NZ First, with a strong emphasis on upgrading heavy rail, including improved access to Northland and its port at Marsden Pt, trains to Auckland Airport and re-opening the Napier to Gisborne line.

The most visible battleground is Auckland, where congestion is choking the city at a cost of $2b a year and people are flocking to trains, buses and ferries to travel to work. Transport, and the crucial role it plays in housing and growth, is on everyone’s mind – and don’t politicians know it.

National’s record in office dealing with Auckland transport is mixed, from rubbishing the City Rail Link to embracing it, the crazy decision to upgrade the Northwestern Motorway without a busway and completing the $1.4b Waterview tunnel – a huge pre-election success story.

In fact, National is using figures showing the tunnel has halved travel times from the city to the airport to stick with cars and buses to the airport in the foreseeable future, while other parties argue over trains or modern trams along the route.

Trams running on light rail along Dominion Rd to the airport. Source / Auckland Transport

Jacinda Ardern’s first public appearance as Labour leader was to announce the party would spend $3b to build tram lines from the Auckland CBD to the airport and West Auckland within 10 years, and complete the first leg of the airport route to Mt Roskill by 2021.

This would be followed by light rail to the North Shore in the second decade.

The Greens have gone one step further and promised to build the full 21km tram route from the CBD to the airport by 2021. They are also promising light rail from the Wellington railway station to Newtown by 2025 and Kilbirnie and the airport by 2027, and a wholly electric bus fleet for the capital city.

Labour and the Greens would allow Auckland Council to introduce a regional petrol tax – possibly 10 cents a litre to raise $100m a year – to hop on board a more ambitious public transport programme for the city.

The two parties have adopted the tram policy from lobby group Greater Auckland, which has also persuaded them to adopt the first stage of its ‘Regional Rapid Rail’ policy for a $20m trial train service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga.

If it’s a success, Labour and the Greens will invest in stages two and three of Rapid Regional Rail, delivering trains that can travel at 160km/h, new rail lines to Rotorua and Cambridge, and a tunnel through the Bombay Hills to reduce travel times from Auckland to Hamilton to 70 minutes.

Labour’s decision to adopt Greater Auckland’s agenda is blatant pitch into Green territory, but it doesn’t bother Greens transport spokeswoman Julie Anne Genter, who believes voters know who is more committed to implementing the policies, and will vote Green to be sure Labour follows through.

The Greens have also made a pitch for the youth and student vote by promising these groups free public transport costing $70m to $80m a year, which they say is less than 1km of new highways being built by National.

Not everyone is on board Greater Auckland’s agenda, and debate still rages within transport circles over trams versus trains to the airport.

NZ First’s plan is for a 7.5km rail line from Puhinui to provide a 30-minute journey by train from central Auckland to the airport terminal – part of its “Railways of National Importance” programme.

NZ First wants to reopen the Napier to Gisborne rail line.

NZ First wants to reopen the Napier to Gisborne rail line.

The party’s transport spokesman, Denis O’Rourke, says NZ First is not afraid to intervene and invest heavily in rail. The party has 13 immediate investment priorities, including upgrading rail in Northland to allow containers and cars to be moved from Northport to an inland port at Kumeu, and extending commuter rail to Kumeu and Huapai in West Auckland.

The Maori Party has proposed a new “IwiRail” network for freight, tourism and regional employment. The party believes the project has the capacity to add $1b into the regions and will be asking their potential coalition partner to invest $350m.

The plan involves connecting Gisborne to the East Coast Main Trunk Line in Kawerau and bringing back the mothballed Napier to Gisborne rail line to create 1250 jobs on the East Coast.

National’s focus is unashamedly on roads while recognising rail has a role to play. It is centred on extending its “Road of National Significance” – begun in 2009 and largely complete – into a new set of major roading projects.

Motorists would get a four-lane highway from Auckland to Whangarei, the $1.8b east-west link through Auckland’s industrial belt and other highway projects throughout the country.

National has also come up with a $2.6b election transport package for Auckland that includes building a new highway alongside the Southern Motorway costing $955m and $615m for the Ameti transport project in southeast Auckland.

The $1.8 billion east-west link through Auckland's industrial belt. Source / New Zealand Transport Agency

The $1.8 billion east-west link through Auckland’s industrial belt. Source / New Zealand Transport Agency

That’s not to say, National is all about roads and Labour and the Greens are all about public transport and long distance trains.

National has spent $1.7b electrifying rail in Auckland, it is paying half the cost of the $3.4b city rail link, committed $267m to rail over the next three years, a third rail track on the busy southern line between Westfield and Wiri, and $835m for a Northwestern Busway.

Labour has announced it will increase regional transport roading projects from $140m to $280m a year, and will proceed with the east-west link in Auckland, albeit a scaled back version of National’s $1.8b scheme.

One area all the main parties agree on is the need to improve cycling and walking in our cities, with National keen to build on a $333m urban cycleway programme and Labour promising to pay for the $30m SkyPath cycle and walkway over the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

Transport policies

National

A strong focus on roads by extending its “Roads of National Significance” to 10 new projects costing $10b, including a four-lane highway from Wellsford to Whangarei and the $1.8b east-west link through Auckland’s industrial belt.

A $2.6b package for Auckland, including a new highway from Manukau to Drury, $615m for the Ameti transport project in southeast Auckland and a $835m Northwestern busway.

National favours cars and buses to the airport in the foreseeable future.

A $267m rail package includes $130m to electrify rail from Papakura to Pukekohe and $37m for Wellington, including double tracking the Hutt Valley line between Upper Hutt and Trentham.

A target of one in three electric or electric hybrid cars in the Government’s fleet of 15,500 cars by 2021.

Labour

Adopted the policy of lobby group Greater Auckland for a congestion free network in Auckland.

The main focus is $3b to light rail for trams from the Auckland CBD to the airport and West Auckland within 10 years, and complete the first leg of the airport route to Mt Roskill by 2021.

This would be followed by light rail to the North Shore in the second decade.

Allow Auckland Council to introduce a regional petrol tax – possibly 10 cents a litre to raise $100m a year.

Adopted the Greater Auckland policy for Regional Rapid Rail, starting with a $20m trial train service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga.

If successful, invest in stages two and three of Rapid Regional Rail with trains that can travel at 160km/h, new rail lines to Rotorua and Cambridge, and a tunnel through the Bombay Hills to reduce travel times from Auckland to Hamilton to 70 minutes.

Fund the $30m SkyPath cycle and walking path over the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

Auckland is the main battleground for transport at this election. Photo / Peter Meecham

Auckland is the main battleground for transport at this election. Photo / Peter Meecham

Green Party

Free public transport for students and anyone under the age of 19.

Like Labour, adopt the policy of lobby group Greater Auckland for a congestion free network in Auckland, but put it on a faster track.

Build light rail for trams from the Auckland CBD to the airport by 2021, and light rail from Wellington railway station to the airport by 2027.

Light rail towards Helensville and dedicated rapid busways to Howick and Botany.

A new track on the southern line to speed up commuter and freight trains.

Adopt the Greater Auckland policy for Regional Rapid Rail, starting with a $20m trial train service between Auckland, Hamilton and Tauranga.

If successful, invest in stages two and three of Rapid Regional Rail with trains that can travel at 160km/h, new rail lines to Rotorua and Cambridge, and a tunnel through the Bombay Hills to reduce travel times from Auckland to Hamilton to 70 minutes.

Allow Auckland Council to introduce a regional petrol tax – possibly 10 cents a litre to raise $100m a year.

NZ First

Emphasis on rail on “Railways of National Importance” and potential for modern tram routes in Auckland over the long term.

Wants to upgrade Northland rail, including a line from Oakleigh to Northport; reopening the Napier to Gisborne rail line and progressive electrification of the main trunk line for improved freight and passenger trains with extensions to Dunedin and Tauranga.

Build a commuter rail link between Swanson, Kumeu and Huapai; heavy rail to Auckland Airport.

Toll state highways in Auckland. Opposed to a regional petrol tax.

Investigate Northport taking some of Ports of Auckland business at Marsden Pt from an upgraded freight rail link to an inland port at Kumeu.

Maori Party

A new “IwiRail” network for freight, tourism and regional employment with the capacity to add $1b into the regions. Ask a potential coalition partner to invest $350m.

Connect Gisborne to the East Coast Main Trunk Line in Kawerau and bring back the mothballed Napier to Gisborne rail line to create 1250 jobs on the East Coast.

IwiRail would receive $100m a year for regional line upgrades and maintenance.

Act Party

Increase the use of funding options to better reflect the principle of users pay, such as tolls on new and existing roads, congestion charges, peak time charges and preferential lanes.

Revenue from tolls should be offset by cuts in petrol taxes.

Technology and entrepreneurship should be encouraged in transport, including ride-sharing, car-sharing, congestion charging and high occupancy toll lanes.

Encourage private sector investments in roads. Review regulation to ensure the viability of autonomous vehicles.

Opportunities Party

Transport is very simple, says deputy leader Jeff Simmons, “politicians should get their grubby hands off it” and leave it to New Zealand Transport Agency to decide on a cost-benefit basis taking into account carbon emissions and accidents.

Ship energy independence from multimode energy harvesting

It is now becoming clear that the appalling emissions from ships that cause global warming and local injuries can be virtually eliminated. A large ship emits the carbon dioxide of 75, 000 cars, NOx of two million cars and particulates of 2.5 million cars (DNVgl) plus large amounts of SOx, something little seen with cars. Now think what a combination of Flettner rotors, Airborne Wind Energy (AWE), sails with multi- mode energy harvesting, reinvented photovoltaics and wave power will do.

Flettner rotors on ships – typically four huge columns – typically exploit the fact that an electrically rotated cylinder in a wind creates thrust. It has better tolerance of wind direction than sails. It could be complementary to AWE which creates electricity using tethered drones or cloth kites way above the ship at 200-1000 meters where winds are four times stronger and more continuous. Photovoltaics as solar road technology applied to large ships can also supply up to MW level particularly if increasingly affordable gallium arsenide is used. All three will be complemented by wave power lifting the ship to reduce drag, a technique that is newly viable. Each gain is multiplicative and the complementary intermittency could lead to a greatly reduced need for batteries and possibly the complete elimination of them.
In 2016 Norsepower’s successful Flettner sea trials showed potential for 20% fuel savings of up to 20% on favourably windy routes. Viking Line plans on reducing ship fuel consumption by 15% or more.

Norsepower and the world’s biggest shipping company, Maersk, to start testing Flettner in Maersk ships starting 2018. Aim is 7-10% of fuel cost leading up to 300000€ savings in big tankers. There should be similarly impressive percentage reduction in emissions.
The world’s first conference on “Energy Independent Electric Vehicles” takes place 27-28 September at the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands. Exclusively on the subject this IDTechEx event will embrace the commercial opportunity and technology roadmap including ship energy independence.

Naval DC describes its many commercially successful large boats that are energy independent and where it is headed. Three organisations present their AWE at 30-100 kW with potential to provide multiple 1MW systems on ships – KiteNRG of Italy, Kitepower of the Netherlands and Kitemill of Norway. Solaroad TNO of the Netherlands presents solar roads suitable for ships that could produce hundreds of kilowatts potentially complementing solar sails that make electricity from sun, wind and rain developed by presenter the University of Bolton in the UK. All that could exceed the megawatts needed and make MWh batteries on ships a thing of the past. Toyota of Japan gives a keynote.

Breakthroughs in enabling technologies such as the necessary electric motors and power electronics are also announced and explained. The event is staged by analyst IDTechEx which has the only comprehensive reports and consultancy on EIVs and enabling technologies such as structural electronics, triboelectric and 6D motion energy harvesting and extreme lightweighting including a report, Electric Boats and Ships 2017-2027.

There are six optional Masterclasses on EIVs and their technologies on September 26 and 29 and a small exhibition and viewings. Partnering the event is TU Delft which has supported more record-breaking solar racers on land and water than anywhere on Earth and researches wind and solar power for vehicles, their power electronics, photovoltaics and dielectric elastomers making electricity from waves.
Source: IDTechEx

Amazon prepares to open first Australian fulfillment centre

Amazon is nearly ready to launch in Australia.

REUTERS

Amazon is nearly ready to launch in Australia.

Amazon’s market entry into Australia has begun with the company announcing it is recruiting “hundreds” of staff for its first fulfillment centre, in South Melbourne.

Australian operations director Robert Bruce said the US retail giant would stock “hundreds of thousands of products” at the fulfillment centre – which at 24,000 square metres is about the size of three rugby pitches – and use it to supply customers across Australia.

“We will be focusing on offering our Australian customers low prices on a great selection of products and can’t wait to get started,” he said.

An Amazon spokeswoman said recruiting had begun but the company had not revealed an opening date.

Information gathered by shipping company MWPVL International suggests that the Melbourne fulfillment centre is about three-quarter’s of the average size for its warehouses, hubs and sorting centres.

Globally, Amazon has 400 facilities with a total footprint of 144 million square-feet, it estimates.

Amazon has declined to say whether it would also supply Kiwi consumers from Australia, which might mean lower delivery costs and shorter shipping times.

A report from broker Forsyth Barr said that if Amazon did that, it could help the company build a business with annual sales of between $122 million and $548m in New Zealand within five years.

But it would be a “logical extension” for Amazon to move directly into New Zealand, open a fulfillment centre here and offer Kiwi consumers its premium Amazon Prime subscription service which provides free two-day delivery, Forsyth Barr said.

That could see it build a business here worth $915m within five years, it said.

Overseas, Amazon bundles Amazon Prime with an internet TV offering, Prime Video, which it has launched as a separate service in New Zealand.

Forsyth Barr speculated Amazon might outbid Sky Television for streaming rights to All Blacks matches and Super Rugby, if it did launch in New Zealand, to give Amazon Prime a boost.

However, there is also speculation Sky and Amazon might strike up a partnership that would see Sky on-sell internet-streaming rights to the rugby while retaining its satellite and free-to-air broadcast rights.

Sky TV spokeswoman Kirsty Way said it was too early to comment on any such scenarios. Amazon has been approached for comment.

 

 – Stuff

CILT annual awards nominations now open

We have received the following information from CILT

 

Call for Award Noms 2017_EMAIL

The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport in New Zealand Incorporated (CILT) offers awards each year according to the details listed in the Categories and Criteria –  use the link below.

They are presented at the Institute’s Annual Awards Dinner  being held in on the 11th October 2017, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Albert St., Auckland.  (The national AGM will be held at 5:00pm)

Categories and Criteria – there has been changes made to the awards, read the instructions carefully as to what is required, check the close dates for the categories.

 

http://www.cilt.co.nz/Category?Action=View&Category_id=67

 

You may nominate yourself or do you know someone else or a company that should be nominated, the nomination form is on the bottom of the information page as is the  IP Declaration form if that applies to your entry.

 

CILT

Current state of New Zealand’s transport system revealed

Hon Tim Macindoe

Associate Minister of Transport
30 June 2017

Current state of New Zealand’s transport system revealed

Associate Transport Minister Tim Macindoe has launched the first product of the Transport Outlook project, the Transport Outlook: Current State report. The Transport Outlook project aims to provide information, data, and analysis on New Zealand’s current and future transport system.

“Understanding transport demand and emerging trends in our transport system is crucial to ensure that we can provide the right information for the general public and transport planners, investors, and policy-makers,” Mr Macindoe says.

“The report combines information from all transport modes for the first time. It provides invaluable information on what is currently happening in the New Zealand transport sector and analysis of what it means.”

Information included in the report ranges from public transport patronage in the main urban centres, freight volumes through ports, passenger numbers through airports, transport deaths and injuries, composition of the vehicle fleet, through to the use of different travel modes for work, education, and personal business.

Some of the key statistics highlighted in the report include:

• More than 36,000 aircraft arrived in New Zealand in 2016, just over double the number in 1998

• Over the last ten years our exports have increased by 74% in volume

• New Zealanders spend on average just under one hour a day travelling

• Two car households are now more common than single car households

• In 2000/2001 there were 86 million public transport boardings by June 2016 this had increased to 148 million boardings

• The use of ferries to cross the Cook Strait has increased 95 per cent since 2000/2001

• About 38 million passengers used our airports in 2016

• Our vehicle fleet has grown 44% since 2000

• Train patronage in Auckland has grown by 67% in five years

• Queenstown is our fastest growing airport in percentage terms

• Only one third of young people have a driver licence, compared with nearly half in 1989

• Only 3 per cent of 5-12 years olds use cycling as a mode of transport

• Between 2014/2015 and 2015/2016 cruise ship passenger numbers increased by 26% to reach a total of 254,409

• There were 138 cruise ship voyages, spending a combined 703 days stationed at a port in 2015/2016

• The largest container vessels coming in to New Zealand ports at the end of 2016 had double the capacity of the largest vessel arriving earlier the same year.

“Later this year the report will be published which will project transport demand over the next 25 years. It will examine future regional travel patterns, including the impact of new and emerging technologies,” Mr Macindoe says.

‘Transport underpins our economy and society. The information provided through the Transport Outlook project will enable us to make informed decisions about transport services and infrastructure. We will be better placed to respond to our growing population and economy and increasing tourist numbers.”

More information on the Transport Outlook project, including the full report and underlying data, can be found here.

Report: Kiwis spend almost an hour a day travelling, but public transport use up

A new transport report shows Kiwis, on average, spend almost an hour a day travelling. Photo / File

New Zealanders are increasingly using public transport to commute, but the number of vehicles on our roads has increased significantly in the past 17 years, a new report shows.

The Transport Outlook: Current State report, released today, gives information on, and an analysis of the country’s current and future transport system.

Figures show Kiwis spend, on average, almost an hour travelling every day.

Statistics from 2010 to 2014 show 53 per cent of people drive a car as their transport mode, 26 per cent were passengers in a vehicle, 17 per cent walked, 3 per cent used public transport, 1 per cent cycled and 1 per cent travelled by motorcycle.

Households with two cars are much more common than those with just one vehicle.

The number of people using public transport bumped up to 148 million public transport boardings last year, compared to 86 million boardings in 2000/2001.

Our vehicle fleet has grown 44 per cent over the past 17 years, and the number of people travelling on trains has gone up 67 per cent in the past five years.

The number of electrical vehicles represent just under 0.1 per cent of the vehicles on our roads, the report says, but they have more than double in the last year to 2430.

One third of young people hold a driver’s licence – compared with almost half in 1989; and 3 per cent of children aged 5 to 12 years old cycled.

Associate Transport Minister Tim Macindoe said the report would help make informed decisions about transport services and infrastructure.

“Understanding transport demand and emerging trends in our transport system is crucial to ensure we can provide the right information for the general public and transport planners, investors and policymakers.

“The report combines information from all transport modes for the first time,” he said.

“It provides invaluable information on what is happening in the New Zealand transport sector and analysis of what it means.”

The report also showed a huge increase in people using our airports, with about 38 million passengers coming through New Zealand airport terminals last year.

There were also 138 voyages (703 port days) via cruise ships in 2015/16. Those cruise ships brought in 254,409 passengers; making up a 26 per cent increase over 2014/15.

For the full report, visit: Transport Outlook Current State 2016

Has Auckland Transport found the answer to the city’s traffic problems?

Auckland Transport has joined forces with global technology giant Microsoft in a bid to make the gruelling daily commute a walk in the park.

With an estimated 800 new cars on Auckland’s roads every day and growing frustration at traffic jams, AT hopes the new system will allow it make real-time, informed decisions to improve travel for everyone.

The partnership aims for

• One nationwide payment method that can be used to for buses, ferries and trains.

• The same method to pay for bike lockers – a box in which a bike can be placed and locked in – at some bus and train stations.

• Up-to-date information on traffic delays and accidents using data from public transport users, traffic cameras, loops (sensors installed in the road to detect vehicles), counters for bikes on the road network, and realtime tracking of bus, train and ferry positions.

• Tailored information on the AT app which will tell commuters of delays and incidents and suggest alternative routes or travel methods.

AT’s chief technology officer Roger Jones said one of the main goals is to allow customers to make an informed decision about their best choice of transport on a daily basis, through the new AT Mobile app.

“The vision is, if you’re sitting at home in the morning wondering how you should get to work and you’re not sure if it’s going to rain or not or you’re not sure if things are running on time or not, the app will inform you about your best choice of transport… and the expected timeline.

“The real impact is people expect to be able to travel round the city quickly and efficiently and today a lot of people do that by cars. We will replace that over time with other modes of transport that will get them there just as efficiently and just quickly and cheaper.”

Jones said otherwise Aucklanders are “going to grind ourselves to a gridlock”.

He gave an example of someone catching a ferry and then a bus to get home at night but, because of bad weather, the ferry is running late.

“Do we hold the bus at the end and wait for the ferry connection or not?” he said.

“Currently that’s not managed so what we want to do is manage that because we will know from our customer database and the data we have, how many passengers we have on the ferry and how many of those passengers are likely to catch the bus.

“So we will be able to make informed decisions about making the bus stay and wait for those passenger ferries.”

The proposed changes are expected to be gradually rolled out over the next two to three years.

Jones said trials were also in progress of a system that would allow people to use one account for all forms of transport, nationwide.

“Ultimately where we want to get to is your transport is seamless, not only in Auckland but around the country, and your payment for that is seamless.”

Microsoft New Zealand’s chief digital advisor Mark Butterworth said AT will make travelling easier by using artificial intelligence based on information such as who the commuter is, where they are trying to go and what is happening on the network.

“One of the features we hope for is we can predict in advance what your journey will be across the modes so you can plan your days better.

“The way [AT] is engaging with customers and trying to make a digital city is certainly right on the edge of all the cities that [Microsoft] see around the world. So, we want to learn from Auckland and this experience in Auckland to help us help other customers,” said Butterworth.

Herald on Sunday

Western Belfast Bypass progress

The Western Belfast Bypass, a four-lane, 5-kilometre stretch of highway north of the city, was 80 per cent completed, the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) said.

“Over 375,000 hours have been worked on this project so far and it is progressing well as this drone footage shows,” Christchurch highways manager Colin Knaggs said.

The $122 million Western Belfast Bypass project is set to be completed in early 2018. NZTA says it is now 80 per cent ...

 The $122 million Western Belfast Bypass project is set to be completed in early 2018. NZTA says it is now 80 per cent complete.
 The newest aerial footage of the $122-million project shows a 2km-long section that was largely out of public view during construction, Knaggs said.

“Aside from some road marking and other minor finishing touches, this section of the project is also close to being finished.”

The Dickeys Rd bridge under construction, as part of the Western Belfast Bypass programme.

 The Dickeys Rd bridge under construction, as part of the Western Belfast Bypass programme.
 Construction crews recently focused on three new bridges – over Groynes Dr, Dickeys Rd and an on-ramp that links Main North Rd and SH1 – which Knaggs said were close to completion.

“Before the project team could start building they had to carry out ground improvement work, constructing around 2400 columns of gravel and stone into the ground to make it denser,” he said.

“This reduces the effects of liquefaction and ensures the bridge embankments remain stable, preventing damage to the bridge structures during an earthquake.”

A further 30 steel-cased concrete piles, up to 20 metres deep, support each structure.

Once completed, in early 2018, NZTA forecast 24000 cars will use the bypass every day.

 – Stuff

Top